Sagamore Institute hosts Rwandan-U.S. Ambassador Mathilde Mukantabana

The Sagamore Institute was honored to welcome Her Excellency Mathilde Mukantabana, Rwandan-U.S. Ambassador for a special event this fall, affirming the Indianapolis-based think tank’s continuing commitment to development in Africa.

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Donald Cassell

The Sagamore Institute was honored to welcome Her Excellency Mathilde Mukantabana, Rwandan-U.S. Ambassador for a special event this fall, affirming the Indianapolis-based think tank’s continuing commitment to development in Africa.

Her presentation highlighted steps taken by the Rwandan government in response to the 1984 genocide, including the implantation of a culture of transparency and accountability in all operations and removing the usual obstacles of private business investment in post-conflict and developing states. Ms. Mukantabana believes the lessons learned through their rebuilding process are applicable to developing states around the world.

Mrs. Mukantabana has served as the U.S. Ambassador since 2013 and is the embodiment of Rwanda’s status as the global leader of gender equality in government. Her Excellency’s awards include the 2012 Peace and Justice Award from the Center for African Peace and Conflict Resolution, and the 2012 Global Peace Award from Global Majority, both on behalf of her admirable efforts in the Rwandan genocide aftermath.

“Part of our mission at Sagamore is to promote human flourishing by encouraging African states to embrace proven policies of national development, good governance, and nation building. It is in the best interests of the United States to have stable well-functioning nation-states in Africa contributing to international peace and prosperity,” shared Sagamore Senior Fellow Donald Cassell.

“Our guests were inspired to hear firsthand stories of a stable, strong and efficient African state creating policy space to promote trade, investment opportunities, education and cultural exchange for their country’s general wellness and capacity growth,” said Cassell.

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